Warmer drier healthier #2: Measuring the extent of thermal bridging in external timber-framed walls in New Zealand

Abbreviation
BRANZ Research Now: Warmer drier healthier #2
Valid from
1/11/2020

Information provider
´╗┐BRANZ Limited
Information type
Research report
Format
PDF

Description

Having our houses well insulated with a minimum of thermal bridges has substantial health, energy efficiency and financial benefits.

Measurements made of 47 newly constructed New Zealand houses found the average percentage of timber framing was much higher than levels assumed by regulators and the industry.

Such high levels indicate that thermal bridging is compromising the thermal performance of walls and may mean that designed R-values are not being achieved.

Scope

The aim was to gain information about:

  • the scale of the issue of high framing percentages in New Zealand houses
  • the effect that high framing percentages have on as-built R-values
  • the reasons why high percentages of framing might be occurring.

This research includes:

  • Results
  • What do the findings mean?
  • Possible explanations for higher framing ratios
  • Conclusion

 

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For assistance with locating previous versions, please contact the information provider.
This resource is not cited by any other resources.

Warmer drier healthier #2: Measuring the extent of thermal bridging in external timber-framed walls in New Zealand

This document is not CITED BY any other resources:

Warmer drier healthier #2: Measuring the extent of thermal bridging in external timber-framed walls in New Zealand

Description

Having our houses well insulated with a minimum of thermal bridges has substantial health, energy efficiency and financial benefits.

Measurements made of 47 newly constructed New Zealand houses found the average percentage of timber framing was much higher than levels assumed by regulators and the industry.

Such high levels indicate that thermal bridging is compromising the thermal performance of walls and may mean that designed R-values are not being achieved.

View on Information Provider website Download this resource (PDF, 990KB)
Warmer drier healthier #2: Measuring the extent of thermal bridging in external timber-framed walls in New Zealand
Description

Having our houses well insulated with a minimum of thermal bridges has substantial health, energy efficiency and financial benefits.

Measurements made of 47 newly constructed New Zealand houses found the average percentage of timber framing was much higher than levels assumed by regulators and the industry.

Such high levels indicate that thermal bridging is compromising the thermal performance of walls and may mean that designed R-values are not being achieved.

View on Information Provider website Download this resource (PDF, 990KB)
This resource does not cite any other resources.

Warmer drier healthier #2: Measuring the extent of thermal bridging in external timber-framed walls in New Zealand

This resource does not CITE any other resources.
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