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Hydraulic neutrality - Build 171(2019)

Abbreviation
Hydraulic neutrality
Valid from
01/04/2019

Information provider
BRANZ Limited
Information type
BUILD article
Format
Website, PDF

Description

With urban densification putting a strain on infrastructure services, some councils now require stormwater to be dealt with in situ, easing the strain on public systems.

For any building or development site, the area of ground able to absorb rainfall is reduced by the roofs of buildings and hard surface areas such as driveways and paving. The soil type also influences how much and how quickly water can be absorbed.

This means that water previously absorbed on an undeveloped site is typically discharged into a council stormwater system instead. The increasing density of urban and suburban development has significantly increased the stormwater load on public utilities.

Scope

This article includes the following parts:

  • Move to hydraulic neutrality
  • Stormwater flood management varies
  • What causes stormwater flooding?
  • Managing stormwater run-off
  • Kapiti Coast case study
    • No additional hazard from developments
    • Ways to achieve hydraulic neutrality
  • Auckland design approach
  • Christchurch guidance
  • Changes needed in designs
For assistance with locating previous versions, please contact the information provider.
View on Information Provider website Download this resource (PDF, 2.1MB)
For assistance with locating previous versions, please contact the information provider.
This resource is not cited by any other resources.

Hydraulic neutrality - Build 171(2019)

This document is not CITED BY any other resources:

Hydraulic neutrality - Build 171(2019)

Description

With urban densification putting a strain on infrastructure services, some councils now require stormwater to be dealt with in situ, easing the strain on public systems.

For any building or development site, the area of ground able to absorb rainfall is reduced by the roofs of buildings and hard surface areas such as driveways and paving. The soil type also influences how much and how quickly water can be absorbed.

This means that water previously absorbed on an undeveloped site is typically discharged into a council stormwater system instead. The increasing density of urban and suburban development has significantly increased the stormwater load on public utilities.

View on Information Provider website Download this resource (PDF, 2.1MB)
Hydraulic neutrality - Build 171(2019)
Description

With urban densification putting a strain on infrastructure services, some councils now require stormwater to be dealt with in situ, easing the strain on public systems.

For any building or development site, the area of ground able to absorb rainfall is reduced by the roofs of buildings and hard surface areas such as driveways and paving. The soil type also influences how much and how quickly water can be absorbed.

This means that water previously absorbed on an undeveloped site is typically discharged into a council stormwater system instead. The increasing density of urban and suburban development has significantly increased the stormwater load on public utilities.

View on Information Provider website Download this resource (PDF, 2.1MB)
This resource does not cite any other resources.

Hydraulic neutrality - Build 171(2019)

This resource does not CITE any other resources.
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