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BU648 Timber shingle and shake roofing

Abbreviation
BU648
Valid from
01/05/2020

Information provider
BRANZ Limited
Information type
BRANZ Bulletin
Format
PDF, Hard copy

Description

Timber shingles and shakes have been used as a lightweight roof cladding in New Zealand for around 200 years. They are mentioned in current design guides for many heritage areas, but they are also found in contemporary styles of housing.

Shingles are sawn and have relatively smooth faces. They usually have random widths and taper in thickness. 

Shakes are usually hand split (although some are also sawn) and usually have a rougher textured surface on at least one side. Widths are generally random. While shakes also taper from a thick to a thin end, they sometimes have a thicker butt end than shingles. This creates a more visible shadow line.

Shingles and shakes are usually manufactured from residual timber left over from the main forest log production. They have a relatively small carbon footprint compared to some other roofing materials. Many of the plantation forests they are sourced from are certified by the FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) or PEFC (Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification).

Scope

This bulletin outlines the selection, design and installation of timber shingle and shake roof cladding.

It covers:

  • describing shingles and shakes
  • suitable species
  • durability
  • water collection from roofs
  • design criteria, including roof weights, exposure dimension, substructure, underlays, solar-driven moisture, material limitations
  • installation, including laying procedure, specific requirements for shingles and shakes, fixings, ridges and hips, valleys, verges and gables, flashings and cavity ventilation
  • finishes
  • maintenance.
For assistance with locating previous versions, please contact the information provider.
Notes/comments

This Bulletin updates and replaces BRANZ Bulletin 443 Timber shingles and shakes.

View on Information Provider website
For assistance with locating previous versions, please contact the information provider.

This Bulletin updates and replaces BRANZ Bulletin 443 Timber shingles and shakes.

This resource is not cited by any other resources.

BU648 Timber shingle and shake roofing

This document is not CITED BY any other resources:

BU648 Timber shingle and shake roofing

Description

Timber shingles and shakes have been used as a lightweight roof cladding in New Zealand for around 200 years. They are mentioned in current design guides for many heritage areas, but they are also found in contemporary styles of housing.

Shingles are sawn and have relatively smooth faces. They usually have random widths and taper in thickness. 

Shakes are usually hand split (although some are also sawn) and usually have a rougher textured surface on at least one side. Widths are generally random. While shakes also taper from a thick to a thin end, they sometimes have a thicker butt end than shingles. This creates a more visible shadow line.

Shingles and shakes are usually manufactured from residual timber left over from the main forest log production. They have a relatively small carbon footprint compared to some other roofing materials. Many of the plantation forests they are sourced from are certified by the FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) or PEFC (Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification).

View on Information Provider website
BU648 Timber shingle and shake roofing
Description

Timber shingles and shakes have been used as a lightweight roof cladding in New Zealand for around 200 years. They are mentioned in current design guides for many heritage areas, but they are also found in contemporary styles of housing.

Shingles are sawn and have relatively smooth faces. They usually have random widths and taper in thickness. 

Shakes are usually hand split (although some are also sawn) and usually have a rougher textured surface on at least one side. Widths are generally random. While shakes also taper from a thick to a thin end, they sometimes have a thicker butt end than shingles. This creates a more visible shadow line.

Shingles and shakes are usually manufactured from residual timber left over from the main forest log production. They have a relatively small carbon footprint compared to some other roofing materials. Many of the plantation forests they are sourced from are certified by the FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) or PEFC (Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification).

View on Information Provider website
This resource does not cite any other resources.

BU648 Timber shingle and shake roofing

This resource does not CITE any other resources.
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